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Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Mar Sat 17, 2012 10:52 am
by blatboy
I've done some searching for some Kim - 1 emulators to work on code when my Micro KIM isn't available. I've found a couple of them mentioned in searches, but many links are dead. I did find the KIMplament, which runs on a 64... but the idea of running an emulator through an emulator... while exciting, isn't exactly what I was hoping for.

Any suggestions? If you know of one that runs on a modern Mac I'll give extra points. ;) (I'm ambidextrous - I run bootcamp on my laptop, so Windows isn't a problem...)

Thanks!

blatboy

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Mar Sun 18, 2012 6:00 am
by wgoodf
I have a version for an old PalmOS device.
No what you are looking for I am sure, but cool none-the-less!

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Mar Sun 18, 2012 10:06 pm
by blatboy
Soft 6502 looks like a possibility...

Image

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Mar Mon 19, 2012 7:02 pm
by blatboy
Whelp, I'm on a flight right now were I can't use my MICRO-Kim. So, I tried using the Soft 6502. Alas, I copied and pasted the clock program into a text document, and loaded it into the emulator. Clock program didn't work. It just gave me "1F1F 00" in the display. From everything I checked it seems the program made it in ok. So, maybe that's a no go. Oh well. I was hoping to practice on this 5 hour flight...

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Mar Mon 19, 2012 10:48 pm
by AartBik
blatboy wrote:Soft 6502 looks like a possibility...


Soft6502 is a very nice 6502 simulator written by Charles Bond, but the downloadable version is not a Kim-1 emulator. The simulator supports the full 6502 instruction set and two 8-bit ports for input and output (located by default at addresses $8000 and $8001), which are visualized by the 8 green and red LEDs in the screenshot above. It also provides "Kim-1 flavored" access to memory through the keyboard and LED display, but no other hardware features (for example, you cannot programmatically access the LED display).

Programs can be entered one byte at the time through the keyboard or, more conveniently, loaded from file. The simulator uses the H6X file format, which is a simple, but surprisingly versatile way of representing 6502 code (essentially an ASCII representation of addresses followed by bytes). A while back I added this format to my cross-assembler (in addition to e.g. paper tape format or C64S), so that programs can be directly loaded to Soft6502.

The "about" says you can contact the author for a full-featured version, so perhaps that one will provide full Kim-1 emulation.

In any case, I find Soft6052 very useful to quickly test small snippets of 6502 code.

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Apr Mon 23, 2012 2:05 pm
by chassum
Hi guys,
I tried Blatboy's experiment and entered the clock program into the soft6502 emulator. (I'm running it with wine on linux). Everything seems ok, but I also got the 1F1F 00 results. Without really looking into things, I'm guessing that the code makes use of one or more routines in the ROM monitor in order to actually work. Can anyone confirm or deny this? Also, what would be involved in loading the ROM code into the emulator. The program looks like it would be a great emulator otherwise.

cheers,
-chassum

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Jul Sun 08, 2012 1:42 am
by AartBik
chassum wrote:Can anyone confirm or deny this?


I hope you saw my previous posting in this thread. Soft6502 is a very nice 6502 simulator, but the downloadable version is not a Kim-1 emulator.

Re: Kim -1 Emulators

PostPosted: Jul Tue 24, 2012 2:13 am
by contra pro adrogans
M.E.S.S. Emulator has a MOS Kim-1 emulator.

Image

To complement MESS, I highly recommend the use of the GUI front-end QMC2. It's a multi-platform GUI front end for several M.A.M.E., M.E.S.S. and U.M.E. variants. It’s known to work on any modern Linux distribution, most UNIX derivatives such as OpenSolaris or FreeBSD, on Mac OS X and Windows (XP, Vista and above).